Trevor Shimizu

Related EAI Public Programs

 
 
Trevor Shimizu: Site Specific
Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) 535 West 22nd Street 5th Floor

October 25th, 2018 6:30-8:30 PM

EAI is pleased to host a special evening with Trevor Shimizu. As conceived by the artist, the event will take a unique form: For one night only, a selection of Shimizu’s video works will be installed in the program space and throughout EAI’s offices. Visitors are invited to enjoy a glass of wine while ‘schmoozing and art touring’ with Shimizu. This rare solo focus on Shimizu’s video work also highlights his connection to EAI’s history and his role as former Technical Director, when he collaborated with artists such as Dan Graham, Shigeko Kubota, and Carolee Schneemann. The event launches EAI’s distribution of Shimizu’s video work. Admission $5, free for EAI members
 
EAI Benefit Art Auction
PPOW + EAI 535 West 22nd Street, 5th + 6th floor

Thursday, April 19th

EAI is pleased to announce its first-ever Benefit Art Auction, to be held on Thursday, April 19. This special event will raise essential funding towards our mission of preserving and providing access to media art’s rich legacies, while fostering powerful new voices.

silent auction hosted by P·P·O·W
535 West 22nd Street, 6th floor, New York, NY

cocktail reception & screenings at EAI
535 West 22nd Street, 5th floor, New York, NY

online bidding available on Artsy
 
"Broadcasting: EAI at ICA"
Institute of Contemporary Art 118 S. 36th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104

February 2nd–March 25th, 2018

With additional programs at Lightbox Film Center, PhillyCAM, Scribe Video Center, Slought, Anthology Film Archives, EAI, and EMPAC.

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is pleased to co-present Broadcasting: EAI at ICA at the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA), Philadelphia, February 2nd through March 25th. Featuring works by artists including Robert Beck, Dara Birnbaum, Tony Cokes, Ulysses Jenkins, JODI, Shigeko Kubota, Kristin Lucas, Shana Moulton, Trevor Shimizu, and TVTV, the exhibition will focus on how artists exploit the act of broadcasting as a subject, as a means of intervention, and as a form of participation across a variety of displays.

The word “broadcast” originated as an agricultural term meaning to disperse seeds widely, but became a figurative description for communications technology in the radio age. In the television era, with which broadcasting is most synonymous, the introduction of personal video equipment fostered a more dynamic interpretation, facilitating a two-way flow of information that resonates with contemporary participatory media. In this spirit, the physical walls of the gallery will extend beyond ICA through a series of collaborations with Lightbox Film Center, PhillyCAM, Scribe Video Center, Slought, Anthology Film Archives, EAI, and EMPAC.

Broadcasting: EAI at ICA is co-curated by Alex Klein, Dorothy & Stephen R. Weber (CHE’60) Curator, ICA and Rebecca Cleman, Director of Distribution, Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)
 
"Edited at EAI": 45th Anniversary Series

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) 535 West 22nd St. 5th Fl.
New York, NY 10011

April–September, 2016

April 27: "Edited at EAI": 1972-77
June 16: "Edited at EAI": Artist to Artist
June 22: "Edited at EAI": Videos by Tom Rubnitz
July 27: "Edited at EAI": Restless Generation
Aug 16: "Edited at EAI": Video Interference
Sept 22: "Edited at EAI": Dara Birnbaum

As part of EAI's ongoing 45th anniversary celebrations, we launched a series of screenings that highlight a less well-known but historically important and creatively fertile area of our programs: EAI's Editing Facility for artists. Established in 1972 with early 1/2" open reel editing equipment, EAI's facility was one of the first such post-production workspaces for artists in the U.S. Over five decades, an extraordinary group of artists has used EAI's facility to create some of the most significant works in media art's diverse histories. Many of these artists and works will be featured in screenings throughout our 45th anniversary year.

The first screening on April 27, "Edited at EAI": 1972-77 featured an eclectic selection of works from the 1970s, charted the alternative artistic, political, and cultural expressions of artists experimenting with emergent video editing technologies and strategies. The program included early works from the 1970s by Ant Farm, Juan Downey, Jean Dupuy, Shigeko Kubota, Mary Lucier, Raindance, Anthony Ramos, Ira Schneider, and Hannah Wilke, among others.

On June 16 Artist to Artist featured the rich collaborative process and the creative relationships between artists and the artists/editors with whom they worked, through the lens of EAI's editing facility. Video works by Cheryl Donegan, Ursula Hodel, Nam June Paik, Carolee Schneemann, and Michael Smith—all edited at EAI—were shown together with works by Robert Beck, Seth Price and Trevor Shimizu, three internationally recognized artists who spent formative years as EAI editors. Artists Robert Buck and Cheryl Donegan were in conversation following the screening.

On June 22 EAI celebrated the video work of Tom Rubnitz (1956-1992), whose deliriously camp genre parodies and music videos capture the anarchic spirit and talents of the 1980s East Village scene of Club 57 and the Pyramid Club. The rich body of work that Rubnitz edited at EAI includes TV spoofs, music videos, and the musical parody Psykho III The Musical (1985). Artist John Kelly participated in a conversation following the screening.

On July 27 Restless Generation focused on a group of conceptually driven performance videos by women artists who reenergized and redefined the genre in the 1990s, as seen through the lens of EAI's editing facility. These lo-fi performances staged for the camera­—by artists such as Vanessa Beecroft, Alix Lambert, Kirsten Mosher, Alix Pearlstein, and Beverly Semmes, among others—evoke the strategies of the first generation of artists working with video in the early 1970s, even as their bold stylizations, ironic sensibility, and explicit nods to consumer culture announced a fresh approach to representations of female identity and the body that spoke emphatically to its time.

On August 16 the series continued with an evening of activist video work from the late 1980s through the mid-1990s. Shot largely on low-end consumer equipment and edited, often off-hours, at EAI, these works use video as an activist tool, confronting urgent issues around the AIDS crisis, race, gender, and sexuality. Videos by ACT UP affinity groups DIVA TV (Damned Interfering Video Activist Television) and House of Color, as well as art collective X-PRZ, were screened along with work by artists Robert Beck and Tom Kalin. Although rooted in the specific political and cultural contexts of that moment, these powerful activist voices
 
"Edited at EAI": Artist to Artist

Videos by Robert Beck, Cheryl Donegan, Ursula Hodel, Nam June Paik, Seth Price, Carolee Schneemann, Trevor Shimizu, Michael Smith. Robert Buck and Cheryl Donegan in conversation.

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) 535 W. 22nd St. 5th Fl.
New York, NY 10011

Thursday, June 16, 2016
6:30 pm

"Edited at EAI": Artist to Artist featured the rich collaborative process and the creative relationships between artists and the artists/editors with whom they worked, through the lens of EAI's editing facility. Video works by Cheryl Donegan, Ursula Hodel, Nam June Paik, Carolee Schneemann, and Michael Smith—all edited at EAI—were shown together with works by Robert Beck, Seth Price and Trevor Shimizu, three internationally recognized artists who spent formative years as EAI editors. Featuring works from the mid-1990s to the mid-2000s, Artist to Artist was the second in EAI's "Edited at EAI" program series. Artists Robert Buck and Cheryl Donegan in conversation following the screening.

Organized in conjunction with EAI's 45th anniversary, the "Edited at EAI" series highlights a historically significant but less well-known area of EAI's programs: EAI's Editing Facility for artists, one of the first such creative workspaces for video in the United States.