Public Programs

Past Public Programs

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"Edited at EAI": 45th Anniversary Series

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 West 22nd St. 5th Fl.
New York, NY 10011

April 27: "Edited at EAI": 1972-77
June 16: "Edited at EAI": Artist to Artist
June 22: "Edited at EAI": Videos by Tom Rubnitz
July 27: "Edited at EAI": Restless Generation
Aug 16: "Edited at EAI": Video Interference
Sept 22: "Edited at EAI": Dara Birnbaum

As part of EAI's ongoing 45th anniversary celebrations, we launched a series of screenings that highlight a less well-known but historically important and creatively fertile area of our programs: EAI's Editing Facility for artists. Established in 1972 with early 1/2" open reel editing equipment, EAI's facility was one of the first such post-production workspaces for artists in the U.S. Over five decades, an extraordinary group of artists has used EAI's facility to create some of the most significant works in media art's diverse histories. Many of these artists and works will be featured in screenings throughout our 45th anniversary year.

The first screening on April 27, "Edited at EAI": 1972-77 featured an eclectic selection of works from the 1970s, charted the alternative artistic, political, and cultural expressions of artists experimenting with emergent video editing technologies and strategies. The program included early works from the 1970s by Ant Farm, Juan Downey, Jean Dupuy, Shigeko Kubota, Mary Lucier, Raindance, Anthony Ramos, Ira Schneider, and Hannah Wilke, among others.

On June 16 Artist to Artist featured the rich collaborative process and the creative relationships between artists and the artists/editors with whom they worked, through the lens of EAI's editing facility. Video works by Cheryl Donegan, Ursula Hodel, Nam June Paik, Carolee Schneemann, and Michael Smith—all edited at EAI—were shown together with works by Robert Beck, Seth Price and Trevor Shimizu, three internationally recognized artists who spent formative years as EAI editors. Artists Robert Buck and Cheryl Donegan were in conversation following the screening.

On June 22 EAI celebrated the video work of Tom Rubnitz (1956-1992), whose deliriously camp genre parodies and music videos capture the anarchic spirit and talents of the 1980s East Village scene of Club 57 and the Pyramid Club. The rich body of work that Rubnitz edited at EAI includes TV spoofs, music videos, and the musical parody Psykho III The Musical (1985). Artist John Kelly participated in a conversation following the screening.

On July 27 Restless Generation focused on a group of conceptually driven performance videos by women artists who reenergized and redefined the genre in the 1990s, as seen through the lens of EAI's editing facility. These lo-fi performances staged for the camera­—by artists such as Vanessa Beecroft, Alix Lambert, Kirsten Mosher, Alix Pearlstein, and Beverly Semmes, among others—evoke the strategies of the first generation of artists working with video in the early 1970s, even as their bold stylizations, ironic sensibility, and explicit nods to consumer culture announced a fresh approach to representations of female identity and the body that spoke emphatically to its time.

On August 16 the series continued with an evening of activist video work from the late 1980s through the mid-1990s. Shot largely on low-end consumer equipment and edited, often off-hours, at EAI, these works use video as an activist tool, confronting urgent issues around the AIDS crisis, race, gender, and sexuality. Videos by ACT UP affinity groups DIVA TV (Damned Interfering Video Activist Television) and House of Color, as well as art collective X-PRZ, were screened along with work by artists Robert Beck and Tom Kalin. Although rooted in the specific political and cultural contexts of that moment, these powerful activist voices

 

Leslie Thornton: Tuned to a Shifting Ground

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 West 22nd Street, 5th floor
New York, NY 10011

EAI is pleased to partner with cinema arts non-profit Mono No Aware to co-present Leslie Thornton: Tuned to a Shifting Ground, a program that includes the world premiere of a new work. Thornton's hybrid film/video Fog Fog Fog Ants was commissioned by Mono No Aware specifically for the occasion and will be available for distribution through EAI.

Working for over four decades, Leslie Thornton has created a deep and complex body of films, videos and installations. For this event, Thornton will present some her earliest works and influences, and touch upon stages of her development as an artist and participant in the shifting ground of technological image making. A student of filmmakers such as Hollis Frampton, Stan Brakhage, Paul Sharits and Peter Kubelka, Thornton locates her work as squarely emanating from avant-garde and verite cinematic traditions. She will trace her own aesthetic shifts from the coolness of structural film to a current interest in the strategies of engagement essential to narrative form. Her new work, Fog Fog Fog Ants, combines a clash of hand-made film and digital imagery, with a beguiling and assaultive monologue performed by Thornton. This program is part of MONO NO AWARE X, an annual festival of expanded cinema and installations taking place from November 3 - December 3, 2016. For more information visit mononoawarefilm.com

 

ZOE BELOFF: A World Redrawn
Book Launch, Screening and Conversation

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 West 22nd Street, 5th floor
New York, NY 10011

EAI is pleased to host a book launch for Zoe Beloff's A World Redrawn: Eisenstein and Brecht in Hollywood, published by Christine Burgin and distributed by Artbook / D.A.P. The evening will feature a screening of Beloff's Glass House, a short film featuring Jim Fletcher and Kate Valk, based on Sergei Eisenstein's notes and drawings for a science fiction movie that he pitched to Paramount Studios in 1930. The screening will be followed by a conversation between Beloff and writer and scholar Anastasiya Osipova, with EAI's Rebecca Cleman.

A World Redrawn: Eisenstein and Brecht in Hollywood will be available for purchase at the event.

 

ANTONI MUNTADAS / MARSHALL REESE: Political Advertisement IX 1952-2016

SVA Theatre

333 W 23rd Street
New York, NY 10011

For thirty-two years, artists Muntadas and Reese have been compiling a history of presidential campaign spots, following the evolution of political advertising from its beginnings in 1952 to the present. Political Advertisement is a personal vision of how politics and politicians are presented through the medium of TV.

For the past nine general elections, the artists have premiered the latest version of the piece in a public presentation, followed by a discussion about the impact of campaign advertising. This year author Michelle Goldberg, senior contributing writer to Slate.com, will moderate a discussion on the role of advertising in the 2016 election. Her work has also appeared in The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, The Nation, The Guardian (UK) and The New Republic.

Occurring the final weekend of this year's campaign, this event will offer a timely and important outlet for discussion. The New York screening takes place at the School of Visual Arts Theatre, located at 333 West 23rd Street, on Friday, November 4th at 7:00pm. This screening is a shared presentation by the School of Visual Arts and EAI.

 

JAIME DAVIDOVICH: Daylong Tribute Screening

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 West 22nd Street, 5th floor
New York, NY 10011

EAI pays tribute to Jaime Davidovich (1936-2016) with a daylong screening of video works by the pioneering conceptual artist. Working with video, installation, and local cable television programming, Davidovich was a major and influential figure in the vanguard of individuals and groups exploring art in the context of mass media. The screening will include a selection of key works, including episodes of the cable access program The Live! Show (1979-1984), which Davidovich hosted in the guise of his buoyant TV alter-ego, Dr. Videovich.

Multiple works will be scheduled throughout the day, with a short break at 3:00pm. A special toast will take place at 6:00pm, followed by a screening of Adventures of the Avant-Garde (1981) and Outreach: The Changing Role of the Art Museum (1977), a collaboration with art critic Gregory Battcock, at 6:30pm.

 

CHARLOTTE MOORMAN: Rarely Seen Television and Video Performances

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 West 22nd Street, 5th floor
New York, NY 10011

EAI is pleased to present an evening focused on groundbreaking performance artist Charlotte Moorman's rarely screened performances for and with television and video. Centered around her extraordinary 1973 televisual "realization" of John Cage's 26' 1.1499" For A String Player at the WNET/Thirteen TV Lab, with collaborators Nam June Paik and Jud Yalkut, this program highlights how radically Moorman calibrated her performances for unconventional contexts, further disrupting traditional artistic hierarchies. Barbara Moore, independent scholar and close associate throughout Moorman's professional career, will be in conversation following the screening.

This program is organized in conjunction with the exhibition A Feast of Astonishments: Charlotte Moorman and the Avant Garde, 1960s-1980s, on view at NYU's Grey Art Gallery through December 10, 2016.

 

ELLEN CANTOR: If I Just Turn and Run

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 W. 22nd St. 5th Fl.
New York, NY 10011

EAI is pleased to present a program of moving image work by Ellen Cantor (1961-2013), whose multimedia art practice advanced bold new feminist representations of sexuality and empowerment. In these diaristic and intimate pieces, Cantor deftly uses the medium of video to appropriate, re-dub, and reframe imagery from such diverse sources as Antonioni, Disney cartoons, John Cassavetes, porn, and classic horror films. Key works, including Evokation of My Demon Sister (2002), Remember Me (1998), and Within Heaven and Hell (1996), will be screened, along with the rarely-seen video If I Just Turn and Run (1998), which was recently rediscovered in Cantor's archive. This event also launches EAI's distribution of a selection of Cantor's moving image work.

This event is part of a series of concurrent exhibitions, public programs, and screenings featuring the work of Ellen Cantor, scheduled throughout Fall 2016. Exhibitions will take place at 80WSE Gallery, Maccarone, Participant Inc., and Foxy Production, with public programs hosted by Skowhegan and the world premiere of Cantor's film Pinochet Porn (2008-2016) at The Museum of Modern Art.

 

"EDITED AT EAI": DARA BIRNBAUM

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 West 22nd Street, 5th floor
New York, NY 10011

EAI's "Edited at EAI" series continues with a special event featuring media artist Dara Birnbaum in conversation with former EAI editors Matt Danowski, Pat Ivers, and Ann Volkes, moderated by Lori Zippay. Birnbaum, one of the most important and influential artists working in video and multi-media installation, will discuss the creative processes surrounding analogue video editing and EAI's "laboratory-studio" atmosphere of the early 1980s with those editors whom she worked with at EAI. A selection of Birnbaum's video works from that period, including Pop-Pop Video: Kojak/Wang (1980), the rarely seen New Music Shorts (1981), with musicians Radio Fire Fight and Glenn Branca), Remy/Grand Central: Trains and Boats and Planes (1980), Fire!/Hendrix (1982), and PM Magazine/Acid Rock (1982), will be screened and discussed in depth.

Organized in conjunction with EAI's 45th anniversary, the "Edited at EAI" series highlights a historically significant but less well-known area of EAI's programs: EAI's Editing Facility for artists, one of the first such creative workspaces for video in the United States.

 

"Edited at EAI": Video Interference
Activist Videos by Artists and Collectives, 1989-1995

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 W. 22nd St. 5th Fl.
New York, NY 10011

EAI continued our 45th anniversary "Edited at EAI" series with an evening of activist video work from the late 1980s through the mid-1990s. Shot largely on low-end consumer equipment and edited, often off-hours, at EAI, these works use video as an activist tool, confronting urgent issues around the AIDS crisis, race, gender, and sexuality. Videos by ACT UP affinity groups DIVA TV (Damned Interfering Video Activist Television) and House of Color, as well as art collective X-PRZ, were screened along with work by artists Robert Beck and Tom Kalin. Although rooted in the specific political and cultural contexts of that moment, these powerful activist voices continue to resonate and find relevance today.

Organized in conjunction with EAI's 45th anniversary, the "Edited at EAI" series highlights a historically significant but less well-known area of EAI's programs: EAI's Editing Facility for artists, one of the first such creative workspaces for video in the United States.

 

"Edited at EAI": Restless Generation

Performance Video, 1993-1999

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 W. 22nd St. 5th Fl.
New York, NY 10011

EAI's "Edited at EAI" series continues with a focus on a group of conceptually driven performance videos by women artists who reenergized and redefined the genre in the 1990s, as seen through the lens of EAI's editing facility. These lo-fi performances staged for the camera­—by artists such as Vanessa Beecroft, Alix Lambert, Kirsten Mosher, Alix Pearlstein, and Beverly Semmes, among others—evoke the strategies of the first generation of artists working with video in the early 1970s, even as their bold stylizations, ironic sensibility, and explicit nods to consumer culture announced a fresh approach to representations of female identity and the body that spoke emphatically to its time.

Organized in conjunction with EAI's 45th anniversary, the "Edited at EAI" series highlights a historically significant but less well-known area of EAI's programs: EAI's Editing Facility for artists, one of the first such creative workspaces for video in the United States.

 

High Line Art & EAI Present:

CHERYL DONEGAN
Your Plastic Video

The High Line

High Line Channel 14
14th St. Passage, W. 14th St.

EAI is pleased to collaborate with Friends of the High Line and High Line Art, on the occasion of our 45th anniversary, to present Your Plastic Video, a program of six videos by Cheryl Donegan, including four rarely seen video works from the 1990s and early 2000s - Guide (1993), Sunflower (1993), Scenes + Commercials (1997), Craft (1999), Stop Me If You Think You've Heard This One Before (2008), and a selection from her recent VINES PROJECT (2015 - ongoing). Exhibited as part of High Line Channel 14, a series of outdoor projections of art videos in the semi-enclosed passageway on the High Line at West 14th Street, this program will be on view daily from 6 pm–10 pm, Aprl 28 –June 29.

 

"Edited at EAI": Videos by Tom Rubnitz
John Kelly in Conversation

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 W. 22nd St., 5th Fl.
New York, NY 10011

EAI continues our 45th anniversary "Edited at EAI" series with an evening celebrating the work of Tom Rubnitz (1956-1992), whose deliriously camp genre parodies and music videos capture the anarchic spirit and talents of the 1980s East Village scene of Club 57 and the Pyramid Club. The rich body of work that Rubnitz edited at EAI includes TV spoofs, music videos, and the musical parody Psykho III The Musical. Downtown performance and drag luminaries, such as Lady Bunny, Sister Dimension, John Kelly, Ann Magnuson, Hapi Phace, John Sex, and Tabboo! star in videos that can seem like screwball TV broadcasts from another dimension. Artist John Kelly, featured in Psykho III The Musical and Drag Queen Marathon (as drag persona Dagmar Onassis), will be in conversation following the screening.

Special thanks to Video Data Bank in Chicago for their generous collaboration on this program. VDB, which celebrates its 40th anniversary this year, has been instrumental in preserving and distributing Tom Rubnitz's video works.

Organized in conjunction with EAI's 45th anniversary, the "Edited at EAI" series highlights a historically significant but less well-known area of EAI's programs: EAI's Editing Facility for artists, one of the first such creative workspaces for video in the United States.

 

"Edited at EAI": Artist to Artist

Videos by Robert Beck, Cheryl Donegan, Ursula Hodel, Nam June Paik, Seth Price, Carolee Schneemann, Trevor Shimizu, Michael Smith. Robert Buck and Cheryl Donegan in conversation.

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 W. 22nd St. 5th Fl.
New York, NY 10011

"Edited at EAI": Artist to Artist featured the rich collaborative process and the creative relationships between artists and the artists/editors with whom they worked, through the lens of EAI's editing facility. Video works by Cheryl Donegan, Ursula Hodel, Nam June Paik, Carolee Schneemann, and Michael Smith—all edited at EAI—were shown together with works by Robert Beck, Seth Price and Trevor Shimizu, three internationally recognized artists who spent formative years as EAI editors. Featuring works from the mid-1990s to the mid-2000s, Artist to Artist was the second in EAI's "Edited at EAI" program series. Artists Robert Buck and Cheryl Donegan in conversation following the screening.

Organized in conjunction with EAI's 45th anniversary, the "Edited at EAI" series highlights a historically significant but less well-known area of EAI's programs: EAI's Editing Facility for artists, one of the first such creative workspaces for video in the United States.

 

"Edited at EAI": 1972-77

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 W. 22nd St. 5th Floor
New York, NY 10011

As part of EAI's ongoing 45th anniversary celebrations, we launched a series of screenings that highlight an under-recognized but historically important and creatively fertile area of our programs: EAI's Editing Facility for artists. Established in 1972 with early 1/2" open reel editing equipment, EAI's facility was one of the first such post-production workspaces for artists in the U.S. Over five decades, an extraordinary group of artists has used EAI's facility to create some of the most significant works in media art's diverse histories. The first screening, which featured an eclectic selection of works from the 1970s, charted the alternative artistic, political, and cultural expressions of artists experimenting with emergent video editing technologies and strategies.

 

Ana Mendieta: Experimental Films and Videos
A Conversation with Ana Janevski, Raquel Cecilia Mendieta, and Lori Zippay


Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 West 22nd St. 5th Floor
New York, NY 10011

EAI presented a screening and discussion around the newly discovered and restored films and videos of Ana Mendieta. Presented in collaboration with Galerie Lelong, New York, the event featured a conversation with Ana Janevski, Associate Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art at The Museum of Modern Art, and Raquel Cecilia Mendieta, Film Archivist for the Estate of Ana Mendieta, moderated by Lori Zippay, Executive Director of EAI.

A number of unknown media works by Mendieta—including Super 8 and 16mm films, ½ inch reel-to-reel videos and a sound piece—recently came to light when the Estate of Ana Mendieta Collection, in collaboration with Galerie Lelong, catalogued, transferred, and preserved the entirety of the artist's moving image works. Revealing aspects of Mendieta's practice that are not as widely known as her ritualistic investigations of body and nature, these newly restored works illuminate Mendieta's technical experimentation and the importance of the moving image to her art.

Among the experimental viewed and discussed were Sweating Blood (1973), Moffitt Building Piece (1973), Butterfly (1975), and Energy Charge (1975).

The exhibition Ana Mendieta: Experimental and Interactive Films will be on view at Galerie Lelong through March 26th.

 

EAI at Moving Image New York 2016

Waterfront New York Tunnel

269 11th Avenue
(Between 27th and 28th Streets)
New York, NY 10001

EAI partnered with Moving Image New York to present LoVid's 2015 video cell-a-scape.

In EAI's 45th anniversary year, we celebrate new moving image work that carries forward a legacy begun in the early days of video and computer technology in the 1960s and 70s. During a residency at the Experimental Television Center (ETC) in Oswego, New York, LoVid (Tali Hinks and Kyle Lapidus) worked with historical image-audio processing devices (including Nam June Paik's "Wobbulator," the Sandin Image Processor, and the Jones Colorizer). The duo began to create their own hand-built synthesizers, culminating in their main instrument, the Sync Armonica, constructed during a residency at Eyebeam in 2005.

cell-a-scape visualizes the juxtaposition of media with physical objects, geographic spaces, and human culture, and foregrounds the porous boundaries between the "reality" of nature and the constructed experience of technology.

 

Dia & EAI Members Event:
Joan Jonas's Volcano Saga

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 West 22nd St. 5th Floor
New York, NY 10011

Dia Art Foundation and Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) presented a special members screening of artist Joan Jonas's Volcano Saga (1989). Shot in Iceland and New York, this 28-minute video is based on a medieval Icelandic Myth, titled Laxdaela Saga, and features Tilda Swinton as a young woman whose dreams foretell the future. Employing layered digital effects, Jonas creates a ritualistic dreamscape of the young woman's imagination and desires. With this event EAI launched our 45th anniversary year. Following the screening, Dia Associate Curator Kelly Kivland lead a Q&A. Please click here to become a Friends of EAI Member.