Public Programs

Past Public Programs

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Barbara Hammer: Artist Talk and Screening

Electronic Arts Intermix

535 W 22nd St., Fifth Floor

Tickets: $7, $5 students, free for members. Purchase here.

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is pleased to present an evening with Barbara Hammer, organized on the occasion of Barbara Hammer: Evidentiary Bodies, a major retrospective at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art and venues throughout New York City. Hammer’s work over five decades is pioneering for its focus on lesbian desire and relationships, and also for its extraordinary formal innovations across media. This screening and artist talk at EAI will formally launch EAI's distribution of Hammer’s moving-image work, and will spotlight the artist’s use of video, early computer animations, and an Internet-based project.

Barbara Hammer’s tactile engagement with film as material is widely appreciated. The artist’s use of color, framing, superimpositions, and dynamic editing has produced a body of work that is uniquely affecting to experience as an audience. A strong emphasis on sensuality, eroticism, and interpersonal relations invites viewers to feel engaged and empowered by watching. Participation is an important consideration for Hammer, who often involves her audience directly in her live performances or interactive artworks.

The immediacy and interactivity of video and computer technologies only furthered Hammer’s exploration of participatory art. This ranged from early Portapak works such as Superdyke Meets Madame X (1975), a collaboration with her then partner, Max Almy, to a prescient Internet-based project, eco_lesbian (c. 1990s). No No Nooky T.V. (1987), a jubilant, candy-colored celebration of female sexuality, is an evocative collapse of media – shot on 16mm film, the work is composed of early computer graphics generated on an Amiga computer and consciously suggests the intimate viewership of television, even when projected in a theater.

Playfulness and good humor are also important aspects of Hammer’s work. In the video Would You Like to Meet Your Neighbor? A New York City Subway Tape (1985), Hammer, dressed in a suit and mask made of subway maps, interviews riders and encourages them to interact with each other. Nudging curmudgeonly New Yorkers to ask their subway neighbors what they’re reading, Hammer collects an indelible portrait of an eccentric city. The Subway Tape embodies Hammer’s interest in social dynamics and the relation between physical and psychological identity.

Following the screening, Hammer will be in dialogue with film and media curator Sally Berger, and will give a demonstration of her echonyc.com/~lesbians Internet project, which offered individuals a communal, anonymous platform for expressing and sustaining lesbian desire and identity—a vital and nurturing endeavor that is in keeping with Hammer’s tremendous influence and contribution.

 

EAI & Capricious at NYABF - Ellen Cantor: I’m Still Coming

MoMA PS1

22-25 Jackson Ave, Long Island City 11101

Presented as part of Printed Matter, Inc.'s New York Art Book Fair in the MoMA PS1 Auditorium. Free admission!

To mark the publication of Capricious's ELLEN CANTOR: I’m Still Coming, EAI and Capricious present a screening of film and video work by artists originally featured in Cantor’s groundbreaking 1993 exhibition Coming to Power: 25 Years of Sexually X-Plicit Art by Women. Cantor’s own video work will screen, along with film and video by Peggy Ahwesh, Cheryl Dunye, Barbara Hammer, and Carolee Schneemann. An informal talk with I’m Still Coming editors and co-curators of the 2016 re-staging of Coming to Power, Pati Hertling and Julie Tolentino, about late friend, artist and provocateur Cantor will follow – taking in their own 2016 re-staging of her Coming to Power exhibition, their new publication, performances, archival materials, and feminist writers – then and now. They will be joined by contributing writers Ashton Cooper, Clara López Menéndez, Amalle Dublon & Constantina Zavitsanos, and Vivian Crockett.

Peggy Ahwesh, The Color of Love, 1994, 10 min, color, sound, 16 mm film on video
Ellen Cantor, Ode to Life (Minuet in G Major), 1997, 3 min, b&w, sound, video
Cheryl Dunye, Vanilla Sex, 1992, 4 min, b&w, sound, video
Barbara Hammer, Dyketactics, 1974, 4 min, color, sound, 16 mm film on video
Carolee Schneemann, Water Light/Water Needle (Lake Mah Wah, NJ), 1966, 11 min, color, sound, 16 mm film on HD video

Running time: 32 minutes

Image: The Color of Love, Peggy Ahwesh, 1994.

 

AFA Preservations: Joan Jonas

Anthology Film Archives

32 2nd Ave, New York, NY 10003

To celebrate Anthology Film Archive's brand new preservations of Joan Jonas' 16mm films Wind (1968) and Songdelay (1973), Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is proud to co-sponsor two evenings surveying these and other 16mm works (including her collaborations with Richard Serra), as well as selections from her later video work.

 

Home Video: Media Art in Response to HIV/AIDS

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 W. 22nd St. 5th Floor
New York, NY 10011

EAI is pleased to partner with the Museum of the City of New York to co-present Home Video: Media Art in Response to HIV/AIDS, a screening and discussion of video work exploring the intersections of art, caretaking, and home. The program will run in conjunction with the exhibition AIDS at Home, now on view at MCNY. George Kuchar’s The Thursday People, a portrait of filmmaker Curt McDowell and those who loved him, will be screened along with a video portrait of artist Martin Wong by Charlie Ahearn and We Care: A Video for Care Providers of People Affected by collective WAVE (Women’s AIDS Video Enterprise).

Charlie Ahearn, WAVE members Alexandra Juhasz and Juanita Mohammed Szczepanski, and EAI's Karl McCool will appear for a discussion, moderated by AIDS at Home curator Stephen Vider.

 

Cecelia Condit: Artist Talk and Screening

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 West 22nd Street, 5th Floor New York, NY 10011

EAI is pleased to host an evening with Milwaukee-based Cecelia Condit, offering a rare opportunity to engage with the artist about her distinct and highly influential video work. The screening program will expand the focus beyond her most well-known macabre feminist tales, Beneath the Skin (1981) and Possibly in Michigan (1983), to include more recent, aesthetically lush, installation works, such as the three-channel Within a Stone’s Throw (2012). Condit will introduce the program and take questions from the audience following the screening.

 

Robert Beck/Robert Buck: Artist Talk and Screening

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 West 22nd Street, 5th Floor New York, NY 10011

EAI is pleased to present an evening focused on the moving image work of Robert Beck/Buck, whose approach to art-making merges cinematic, televisual, and visual art aesthetics and strategies to singular effect. Alongside a selection of his video art works, the evening will feature Beck’s nearly year-long conceptual broadcast project, The Space Program (1985-86), an early, largely unconsidered work in the artist’s career – here screened publicly for the first time since its original broadcast late night on Manhattan Cable Television. Buck will introduce the program, and be in conversation following the screening.

Buck, who changed his father’s name as a work, or act, of art in 2008, was integrally involved in EAI from the 1980s to the early 2000s, in roles including Technical Director and Chief Editor. This event will launch EAI’s distribution of Beck/Buck’s video work.

 

Symposium: Utopian Potentials and Media(ted) Realities

Gallery at BRIC House

647 Fulton Street
Brooklyn, NY 11217

Utopian Potentials and Media(ted) Realities will explore the promise of Public Access television and open network technologies, featuring cultural producers from the 1970s to present. Speakers include legendary Public Access host Glendora Buell, members of Colab, and a panel with Robert Buck, Carmel Curtis, and Tara Mateik, moderated by EAI’s Director of Distribution, Rebecca Cleman.

Keeping television technology accessible to artists and the public was at the core of EAI’s founding mission. In his 1973 “manifesto” for the organization, founder Howard Wise wrote about the promise of television as an artistic tool: “[The artist’s] targets will be, no doubt, those thoughtful and concerned persons who are also eager to discern the truth, whether it be in art, in politics, in social and economic problems – those who eschew banality and seek meaning in their activities and their lives. In other words, the very people whom commercial TV neglects and ‘turns off.’”

At BRIC, Cleman will discuss the connection between technology, Public Access, and activism with artist and former EAI Technical Director Robert Beck/Buck; archivist and XFR Collective member Carmel Curtis; and artist, activist, and educator Tara Mateik. The panelists will draw from their experiences working in and for alternative media facilities to focus on access as a key concern. They will consider current debates about the role of art related to politics and representation, and how access relates to education, public outreach, and the means of production.

The panel will be accompanied by a screening of Beck’s The Feeling of Power (1990), produced for DIVA TV to document a 1989 ACT UP protest at Trump Tower, and an excerpt of Mateik’s Putting the Balls Away (2008), a re-enactment of the historic 1973 tennis match between Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs, broadcast by BCAT (now BRIC) on the 35th anniversary of the original event.

This symposium is FREE with advance RSVP.

 

GENERAL IDEA at Migrating Forms

Peter Jay Sharp Building
BAM Rose Cinemas

30 Lafayette Ave
Brooklyn, NY, 11217

EAI will partner with Migrating Forms festival to present two programs by artist collective General Idea (1969-1994).

General Idea (AA Bronson, Felix Partz and Jorge Zontal) forged a unique conceptual practice that deployed parody and irony to critique the artworld and popular media culture. In performances, installations, video, photography, prints, and editions, they explored social phenomena ranging from the production, distribution and consumption of mass media images to gay identity and the AIDS crisis.

Now in its eighth annual edition, Migrating Forms spotlights a range of moving-image work from international festivals, museums, biennials, and microcinemas in the common context of the cinema.

 

Public Access/Open Networks

Gallery at BRIC House

647 Fulton Street
Brooklyn, NY 11217

EAI is pleased to partner with BRIC on the exhibition Public Access/Open Networks, on view from March 23, 2017 through May 7, 2017. Curated by: Jenny Gerow, Assistant Curator at BRIC, in collaboration with freelance curators Reya Sehgal and Lakshmi Padmanabhan

Public Access/Open Networks showcases both historic and contemporary art works inspired by and produced for Public Access television. The exhibition features over twenty artists and collectives that have worked in the Public Access arena, as well as contemporary artists experimenting with the democratic potential of new media platforms on the Internet. As part of the exhibition, BRIC’s own Public Access television channels will also air continuously in the gallery space, and a stage in the center of the gallery will act as a set for the production of new programming by BRIC’s community producers.

In conjunction with the exhibition, EAI and BRIC will co-present the symposium Utopian Potentials and Media(ted) Realities on April 22, 2017 from 12-4pm.

 

Dia & EAI Members' Event: Featuring Lawrence Weiner

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 West 22nd Street, 5th Floor
New York, NY 10011

Dia Art Foundation and Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) are pleased to present a special members' screening featuring two moving image works by Lawrence Weiner.

Lawrence Weiner's moving image works extend his signature conceptual and language-based practice into cinematic and digital realms. Blue Moon Over explores language through animated “motion drawings” and text fragments. Restored with a new video transfer in 2011, Altered to Suit is an experimental 'day in the life of' narrative, as told through playfully dissonant image, dialogue, and sound.

Learn more about the Friends of EAI Membership Program here.

 

KEN JACOBS: Star Spangled to Death

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

535 West 22nd Street, 5th floor
New York, NY 10011

EAI supports the advancement of public access, engagement, and discussion — and the radical voices of artists and the power of art as agents of change.

This Friday, January 20th, we invite you to join us for a free, day-long screening of Ken Jacobs' seven-hour epic, Star Spangled to Death (1956-60/2003-04). Compiling found footage and archival material beginning in 1957, Jacobs spent decades filming, observing, and responding to American culture and history. We welcome everyone to join us on this day of action and reflection.