Public Programs

Past Public Programs

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Frank Heath: Artist Talk and Screening

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

264 Canal Street #3W
New York, NY 10013

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is pleased to present an evening with Frank Heath, whose moving-image works explore the inner workings of underground infrastructures, communication networks, bureaucratic procedures, and other complex systems. Often, Heath reaches absurd conclusions, wryly revealing the disperse and bureaucratic nature of power structures and their susceptibility to human folly and historical contingency. EAI will screen three pieces, including the recently-completed archival montage Protect Your Home (Interpret It Well), a music video about home security accompanying a composition by percussionist Ches Smith.

Heath will appear in conversation following the screening. This event celebrates EAI’s distribution of the artist’s work, added to the catalogue in 2021.

RSVP here. Seating is first come, first serve. RSVP does not guarantee entry, but helps us track interest and send event updates and reminders.

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)’s venue is located at 264 Canal Street, 3W, near several Canal Street subway stations. Our floor is accessible by elevator (63" × 60" car, 31" door) and stairway. Due to the age and other characteristics of the building, our bathrooms are not ADA-accessible, though several such bathrooms are located nearby. If you have questions about access, please contact cstrange@eai.org in advance of the event.

Masks are strongly encouraged. If you are experiencing a fever, cough, shortness of breath, loss of taste or smell, or other symptoms that could be related to COVID-19, we ask that you please stay home.

 

Maggie Lee: Fall Rainbowz

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

264 Canal Street #3W
New York, NY 10013

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is pleased to present Maggie Lee: Fall Rainbowz, a special evening with the artist. Reflecting Lee’s unique collage-based approach and eclectic range of influences, this free event will take a hybrid form, flowing between a screening, performance, exhibition, and open-ended social gathering, transforming the space into a temporary extension of the artist’s studio. Lee will arrange and draw from a diverse array of found material and media, from Roger Vadim’s garish space opera Barbarella (1968) and Mauricio Kagel’s evasive musical compositions, to multicolored lightbulbs and freshly-fallen autumn leaves.

In the time-honored lineage of DIY distribution and punk show merch tables, an assortment of books, records, clothing, accessories, and other ephemera will be available for sale from Lee, Electronic Arts Intermix, Ailanthus Books, Fusetronsound, and Mittens Shop.

RSVP here.

Please note that we expect this event to reach capacity.

We will open the doors at 6:30 pm, and the performance will take place at 7:30 pm sharp. There will be a limited number of seats, plus standing room. We will pause new arrivals and re-entries for the duration of the performance. In the event we reach capacity, an RSVP does not guarantee entry.


Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)’s venue is located at 264 Canal Street, 3W, near several Canal Street subway stations. Our floor is accessible by elevator (63" × 60" car, 31" door) and stairway. Due to the age and other characteristics of the building, our bathrooms are not ADA-accessible, though several such bathrooms are located nearby. If you have questions about access, please contact cstrange@eai.org in advance of the event.

Masks are strongly encouraged. If you are experiencing a fever, cough, shortness of breath, loss of taste or smell, or other symptoms that could be related to COVID-19, we ask that you please stay home.



This program is made possible with generous support from mediaThe foundation inc.

 

Broadcasting: Book Launch and Screening

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

264 Canal Street #3W
New York, NY 10013

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is pleased to present an evening of video and television works celebrating the publication launch of Broadcasting: EAI at ICA. This free screening features selections from the 2018 exhibition of the same name, and reflects on artist responses to themes of media saturation, commercialization, duration, and public engagement. Copies of the catalog will be for sale.

Free to attend. RSVP here.

Following the mass adoption of cable TV and home video recording technology in the early ‘80s, many artists had access to a new arsenal of strategies for intervening directly with televised media. Public broadcast carved out a space for experimentation, a sensibility showcased in such series as Jaime Davidovich’s The Live! Show (1979-84) and Robert Beck’s The Space Program (1985-86), both aired on the Manhattan Cable Network. The advent of specialized networks also presented new opportunities to mingle artists’ media with “normal” televised content: MTV, with their hip youth audience in mind, invited a number of artists to create culture-jamming interstitials in between music videos including video art pioneer Dara Birnbaum, and initiatives such as TRANS-VOICES commissioned artists including Birnbaum, Bruce and Norman Yonemoto, Philip Mallory Jones, and Tom Kalin to produce 60-second spots for American and French broadcast. As the choices on the TV remote became more vast, so too did an overwhelming sense of content glut and advertising onslaught. New consumer video formats like VHS and Betamax gave a new generation of artists the license to remix and deconstruct these images, a practice exemplified by works such as Cable Xcess (1996), a faux-infomercial by Kristin Lucas that warns of the long-term consequences of exposure to electromagnetic fields, and No Sell Out... or i wnt 2 b th ultimate commodity/ machine (Malcolm X Pt. 2) (1995), a stunning MTV-style indictment of consumerism and racial capitalism by “art-band” X-PRZ.

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)’s venue is located at 264 Canal Street, 3W, near several Canal Street subway stations. Our floor is accessible by elevator (63" × 60" car, 31" door) and stairway. Due to the age and other characteristics of the building, our bathrooms are not ADA-accessible, though several such bathrooms are located nearby. If you have questions about access, please contact cstrange@eai.org in advance of the event.

Masks are strongly encouraged. If you are experiencing a fever, cough, shortness of breath, loss of taste or smell, or other symptoms that could be related to COVID-19, we ask that you please stay home.

 

Around Space: Works by Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Sujin Lee, and Jesse Chun

Spectacle Theater

124 S 3rd St
Brooklyn, NY 11249

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) and Wendy's Subway are pleased to co-present a screening of Theresa Hak Kyung Cha's video works at Spectacle Theater, featured alongside works by artists Sujin Lee and Jesse Chun. Grappling with the porosity of language, historicity, geopolitics and more, Cha, Chun, and Lee’s works explore these issues with dexterity and playfulness. Between the subtle and obvious gestures towards Cha in both Chun and Lee’s works, the screening will be an exciting opportunity for audiences to view Cha’s work in community, and in conjunction with artists working in and along her lineage.

This event is part of Wendy's Subway's series The Quick and the Dead, a yearlong, multi-phase project that bridges the life, work, and legacy of a deceased writer to those of contemporary practitioners. In its third year, the program focuses on Korean American artist Cha (1951–1982), and considers her profound interventions in film and video, historiography, language and translation, and autobiographical writing. Cha’s exploration of the porousness between artistic mediums leaves indelible marks on contemporary art, especially film and video.

Purchase tickets here.

 

Radical Accessibility: Making Media Art Collections Truly Accessible

NYU Center for Disability Studies

RSVP here.

A transcript of this event is available by request. To access, please email cstrange@eai.org.

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) and NYU Center for Disability Studies are thrilled to co-present a roundtable discussion on relevant histories, practices, and standards for audiovisual accessibility in moving image art distribution. The panel will include distributor Ben Cook of LUX (London, UK), writer Louise Hickman, artist Darrin Martin, and Mara Mills (NYU CDS).

This program takes its cue from Emily Watlington’s research and accompanying lecture, “The Radical Accessibility of Video Art (For Hearing People),” presented by LUX in 2020. Participants will address how use of the term “access” to describe the circulation of moving image art, especially by distributors, has not fully considered accessibility—in particular for audiences with disabilities. The conversation will look forward, building speculative and material strategies for a sustainable practice of accessibility in moving image distribution through active captioning, subtitling, and engagement with disabled artists, among other approaches. The event coincides with the upcoming release of Crip Authorship: Disability as Method (NYU Press), edited by Mara Mills (NYU CDS) and Rebecca Sanchez.

Benjamin Cook is the founder director of LUX and LUX Scotland, the UK agencies for the support and promotion of artists’ working with the moving image, and represents Europe’s largest collection of film and video works by visual artists. He has been professionally involved in the visual arts and independent film sector in the UK for the past 25 years as a curator, archivist, producer, writer and teacher.

Louise Hickman is a research associate at the Minderoo Centre of Technology and Democracy, University of Cambridge. Previously, she was at the London School of Economics and the Ada Lovelace Institute’s JUST-AI Network on Data and AI Ethics. Her research draws on critical disability studies, feminist labor studies, and science and technology studies to examine the historical conditions of access work. She holds a PhD in Communication from the University of California, San Diego, and is currently working on a book manuscript tentatively titled “Crip AI: The Automation of Access.”

Darrin Martin creates videos and installations that engage qualities of perception mediated through the lens of both obsolete and new technologies. His latest projects consider ways in which meaning is layered and performative using sonic analogies and audio descriptions. Through collaborations with artist Torsten Zenas Burns, they build speculative fictions around re-imagined educational practices and dystopian cosplay paradigms. Martin is a Professor in the Art and Art History Department at University California, Davis.

Mara Mills is Associate Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University. She is a co-founder and editorial board member for the journal Catalyst: Feminism, Theory, Technoscience. Most recently, she is the co-editor of Testing Hearing: The Making of Modern Aurality (Oxford, 2020) and Crip Authorship: Disability as Method (NYU Press, 2023). With Jonathan Sterne, she is writing a book on the history of time-stretching. She is co-founder and co-director of the NYU Center for Disability Studies, where she is currently co-directing the NSF-funded project How to be Disabled in a Pandemic.

The NYU Center for Disability Studies (CDS) promotes disability scholarship, artistry, and activism through: public events, a monthly seminar, an undergraduate Disability Studies Minor and Disability Student Union, and collaborations with other arts and academic centers nationally and internationally. The Center is currently co-directed by Faye Ginsburg (Anthropology/Faculty of Arts & Sciences) and Mara Mills (Media, Culture, and Communication/Steinhardt).

 

EAI at Frieze

Frieze New York at The Shed

545 W 30th St
New York, NY 10011

On the occasion of the organization's 50th anniversary, Frieze has invited Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) to program a series of videos from its collection of over 4,000 titles. This selection offers a dynamic overview of the strategies and concerns of an intergenerational array of artists whose work experiments with communications technology, ranging from television to social media. Videos from the EAI collection will appear throughout the fair, on large-scale monitors at its entrance and in lobbies on two floors. EAI's participation is part of a program spotlighting New York non-profits organizations that have celebrated significant anniversaries in the past year, alongside peers Artists Space, A.I.R., and Printed Matter Inc. Works featured include:

Program #1 (4th floor, CRT monitor):
Anthony Ramos, Balloon Nose Blow-Up, 1972, 11:18 min
Kristin Lucas, Cable Xcess, 1996, 4:48 min
Jaime Davidovich, The Live! Show Promo, 1982, 5:32 min
Joan Jonas, Duet, 1972, 4:23 min
Ulysses Jenkins, Inconsequential Doggereal, 1981, 15:13 min
Robert Beck, The Feeling of Power, 1990, 9 min
Cecelia Condit, Possibly in Michigan, 1983, 11:40 min
Ellen Cantor, Evokation of My Demon Sister, 2002, 4:38 min

Program #2 (6th floor, HD monitor)
Ulysses Jenkins, Notions of Freedom, 2007, 15:47 min
Trevor Shimizu, Lonely Loser Trilogy (Skate Videos), 2013, 14 min
Shana Moulton, Restless Leg Saga, 2012, 7:14 min
Peggy Ahwesh, The Falling Sky, 2017, 9:30 min
Tony Cokes, B4 and After the Studio, Part 1, 2019, 11:02 min
Maggie Lee, WINGS1 + WINGS2, 2013, 1:59 min
Maggie Lee, Department Store, 2021, 7:50 min

Mezzanine monitors
Peggy Ahwesh, The Falling Sky, 2017, 9:30 min
Trevor Shimizu, Lonely Loser Trilogy (Skate Videos), 2013, 14 min

 

Book signing: Trevor Shimizu at Printed Matter, Frieze New York

Printed Matter at Frieze

545 W 30th St,
New York, NY 10001

In celebration of the launch of Broadcasting: EAI at ICA, advance copies of the book are now for sale at Printed Matter, Frieze New York at The Shed. Artist Trevor Shimizu will appear in person to sign copies. Pre-orders for the book are also available here.

Broadcasting: EAI at ICA marks the 50th anniversary of Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), one of the first nonprofit organizations dedicated to the advocacy for and development of video as an art form, providing a crucial space of production and mode of distribution. The book pays tribute to EAI as a site of exchange between an inter-generational group of artists whose time-based artworks are produced in concert with their means of circulation, from the democratic platform of public access television to the instantaneity of social media. The book features an oral history with Lori Zippay, EAI’s Director Emerita, that charts the growth of EAI against the backdrop of a changing New York art world, alongside critical essays by the curators and contributions by artists Antoine Catala, Tony Cokes, Ulysses Jenkins, and Sondra Perry.

Featuring works in the ICA exhibition by Beth B, Robert Beck/Buck, Dara Birnbaum, DCTV, DIVA TV, Tony Cokes, Ulysses Jenkins, JODI, Philip Mallory Jones, Tom Kalin, Shigeko Kubota, Kristin Lucas, Victor Masayesva, Jr., Shana Moulton, Nam June Paik and Paul Garrin, Radical Software Group (RSG), Martha Rosler and Paper Tiger Television, Trevor Shimizu, Squat Theatre, TVTV, Video Venice News, X-PRZ, and Bruce and Norman Yonemoto.

Edited by Rebecca Cleman and Alex Klein. Co-published with the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania. Designed by Geoff Han and Anna Feng.

 

Book signing: Trevor Shimizu at Printed Matter, Frieze New York

Printed Matter at Frieze

545 W 30th St,
New York, NY 10001

In celebration of the launch of Broadcasting: EAI at ICA, advance copies of the book are now for sale at Printed Matter, Frieze New York at The Shed. Artist Trevor Shimizu will appear in person to sign copies. Pre-orders for the book are also available here.

Broadcasting: EAI at ICA marks the 50th anniversary of Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), one of the first nonprofit organizations dedicated to the advocacy for and development of video as an art form, providing a crucial space of production and mode of distribution. The book pays tribute to EAI as a site of exchange between an inter-generational group of artists whose time-based artworks are produced in concert with their means of circulation, from the democratic platform of public access television to the instantaneity of social media. The book features an oral history with Lori Zippay, EAI’s Director Emerita, that charts the growth of EAI against the backdrop of a changing New York art world, alongside critical essays by the curators and contributions by artists Antoine Catala, Tony Cokes, Ulysses Jenkins, and Sondra Perry.

Featuring works in the ICA exhibition by Beth B, Robert Beck/Buck, Dara Birnbaum, DCTV, DIVA TV, Tony Cokes, Ulysses Jenkins, JODI, Philip Mallory Jones, Tom Kalin, Shigeko Kubota, Kristin Lucas, Victor Masayesva, Jr., Shana Moulton, Nam June Paik and Paul Garrin, Radical Software Group (RSG), Martha Rosler and Paper Tiger Television, Trevor Shimizu, Squat Theatre, TVTV, Video Venice News, X-PRZ, and Bruce and Norman Yonemoto.

Edited by Rebecca Cleman and Alex Klein. Co-published with the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania. Designed by Geoff Han and Anna Feng.

 

Intermixing: EAI and The Kitchen In Conversation with Alex Klein

The Kitchen

512 West 19th Street
New York, NY 10011

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) and The Kitchen recently celebrated their 50th anniversaries. Rebecca Cleman, EAI’s Director, and Alison Burstein, Curator at The Kitchen, reflect on their shared organizational histories rooted in an alternative arts ecology and how it informs their institutional roles in the present. The conversation is moderated by Alex Klein, Dorothy and Stephen R. Weber (CHE’60) Curator at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia.

The event also celebrates the release of the publication Broadcasting: EAI at ICA, now available for pre-order. Copies of the book will be available for purchase.

 

First World Order

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) and Triple Canopy

264 Canal Street #3W
New York, NY 10013

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) and Triple Canopy are pleased to co-present First World Order, a screening of works by Ilana Harris-Babou and Ulysses Jenkins followed by a discussion between Harris-Babou and writer Yasmina Price. The event will be in-person at 264 Canal Street, as well as livestreamed online and viewable after the fact. It will be accompanied by an online program of works by Harris-Babou, Jenkins, Philip Mallory Jones (whose video First World Order inspired this project's title), and Anthony Ramos, available at EAI's website.

The herbalist Alfredo Bowman, popularly known as Dr. Sebi, often asked, “What were we eating before we were taken from Africa, before there was an invasion by the man from Europe?” Dr. Sebi’s answer came in the form of a diet that eschewed “Caucasian food” and emphasized fruits, vegetables, and pulses, which he promoted as complementing “the African gene structure.” Drawing on Black nationalist movements as well as Hippocrates and the Old Testament, the quietly charismatic (and unlicensed) practitioner traced all diseases afflicting Black people to their displacement from Africa through the transatlantic slave trade. Before dying in 2016, he had attracted a global following that included Lisa “Left Eye” Lopes, Michael Jackson, and Nipsey Hussle, as well as numerous charges of fraud for claiming that his treatments cured illnesses as various as herpes, HIV, and diabetes. In her video Leaf of Life (2022), the artist Ilana Harris-Babou considers Dr. Sebi’s amalgamation of tradition, myth, and persona—which enabled him to advance an identity rooted in the bodies of Black people around the world—and asks how distrust of American institutions contributes to the appeal of his message.

Harris-Babou's work will be presented alongside two selections from Ulysses Jenkins's The Video Griots Trilogy, a series of video meditations on history and culture. In Self-Divination, the artist speaks poetically about the origins and realities of the African diaspora, and Mutual Native Duplex is a video essay on the mutual alliances between Native and African Americans which celebrates the "neo-American model" of inter-cultural cooperation that grew out of these encounters.

Following the screening, Harris-Babou will be joined by Yasmina Price to discuss the political concerns and representational strategies expressed in the works. They’ll ask how, today, artists are envisioning forms of belonging that defy the logic of time and space, and that turn to tradition without succumbing to nostalgia—or eliding the particular conditions and historical experiences that define diasporic populations.

RSVP here to attend the event (or watch the livestream).

All attendees are required to present proof of full vaccination against COVID-19 and to wear masks unless otherwise indicated. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis (even for those who have RSVP’d). The doors will open thirty minutes prior to the event and attendance will be limited, given safety concerns and the capacity of our venue.

Triple Canopy’s venue is located at 264 Canal Street, 3W, near several Canal Street subway stations. Our floor is accessible by elevator (63" × 60" car, 31" door) and stairway. Due to the age and other characteristics of the building, our bathrooms are not ADA-accessible, though several such bathrooms are located nearby. If you have questions about access, please contact rachel@canopycanopycanopy.com in advance of the event.

 

Computer Art Festivals Panel #2: Digital Art and Institutional Models

Creative GC: Art Science Connect

RSVP here.

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) and the CUNY Graduate Center’s Art and Science Connect are pleased to co-present a pair of panels inspired by the legacy of the Computer Art Festivals (1973-1975), alongside an online presentation of video works, programs, and materials from the event’s three year history. In the first panel, organizers and artists from the initial festivals will discuss the original impetus for the project, the nature of computer art at the time, and the event’s resonances today. In the second, contemporary digital art practitioners and institutional voices will consider the role of institutions in producing and shaping art made with computers.

At the time of the Computer Art Festivals in the 1970s, art made with computers was largely the domain of institutions. From university and private research laboratories to alternative arts organizations and galleries, institutions were necessary to steward expensive equipment, facilitate information exchange, and build context for emerging forms. In the intervening decades, computer art (now referred to as digital art) has transformed considerably alongside the rapid development of technology and digital culture, and drastic shifts in public and private funding structures. With the advent of personal computing and ostensibly decentralized distribution, the role of such institutions in producing and shaping the context of art made with computers has been questioned and reconfigured. This conversation will engage contemporary artists and institutional voices to consider the role of institutions in digital art today. Has technology made such institutions redundant, or more critical than ever? What roles might institutions play in supporting emerging digital practices, now and in the future?

This panel will include Rebecca Cleman, Auriea Harvey, Kelani Nichole, Lumi Tan, and Addie Wagenknecht, moderated by curator Tina Rivers Ryan. RSVP here. Image: installation shot of Addie Wagenknecht, XXXX.XXX, 2014, photograph by John Berens.

Learn more about Panel #1: A Conversation with Original Participants here.

 

The Work of Bruce & Norman Yonemoto

Anthology Film Archives

32 2nd Ave, New York, NY 10003

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is pleased to partner with Anthology Film Archives to host artist Bruce Yonemoto for a retrospective of the video work he and his brother Norman Yonemoto have created, both together and separately, since the mid-1970s. Working largely collaboratively until Norman’s death in 2014, the Yonemotos hold a unique place in the history of avant-garde cinema and video art. Their work can be viewed through many different prisms: proudly Queer and committed to conveying the perspective and history of Asian-American (specifically, Japanese-American) culture, their films, videos, and installations also reflect a distinctively West Coast mentality, steeped in the radiance (and the shadows) of Hollywood’s glamorous myths, illusions, and ideologies.

Raised in Santa Clara, California, in the immediate postwar years, with their mother’s experience in the Japanese-American concentration camps informing their upbringing, the brothers both embraced careers in visual culture early on: Norman attended film school at UCLA and the American Film Institute, while Bruce studied art at UC Berkeley, the Sokei Bijitsu Gakkō in Tokyo, and the Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles. Despite these initially separate paths – and after Norman cut his filmmaking teeth making both agit-prop shorts and the adult film Brothers – they almost immediately embarked on a collaborative career, beginning with the X-rated feature Garage Sale (1976). Soon after, they began a trilogy of video works known as the “Soap Opera Series” – a title that reflected their ongoing preoccupation with the conventions of television soap opera in particular and the codes and forms of mass media in general.

The Yonemotos’ extraordinary video works of the 1980s and 90s are irreverent, ironic, gleefully stylized, and yet closely attuned to the ways in which the grammar and iconography of television and industrial cinema shape modern life. Collaborating with a gloriously eclectic array of artists and performers including Mike Kelley, Tony Oursler, Spalding Gray, Jeffrey Vallance, Patricia Arquette, Ron Vawter, Mary Woronov, and Michael Smith, their body of work represents a fascinating nexus of figures, themes, and ideas.

Following Norman’s death in 2014, Bruce continued making single-channel video pieces, in addition to his photographs, installations, and sculptural works. This comprehensive retrospective will encompass almost all of the Yonemotos’ collaborative works, as well as Norman’s Second Campaign and Brothers, and a selection of the solo works Bruce has created since the turn of the millennium.

Bruce Yonemoto will appear in person for the majority of the screenings, with other special guests to be announced.

For a full list of showtimes, please see the Anthology Film Archives website.

 

Computer Art Festivals Panel #1: A Conversation with Original Participants

Creative GC: Art Science Connect

RSVP here.

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) and the CUNY Graduate Center’s Art and Science Connect are pleased to co-present a pair of panels inspired by the legacy of the Computer Art Festivals (1973-1975), alongside an online presentation of video works, programs, and materials from the event’s three year history. In the first panel, organizers and artists from the initial festivals will discuss the original impetus for the project, the nature of computer art at the time, and the event’s resonances today. In the second, contemporary digital art practitioners and institutional voices will consider the role of institutions in producing and shaping art made with computers.

First organized by Dimitri Devyatkin in 1973, the Computer Art Festivals were an instrumental forum for the convergence of art and computing technology at a formative moment in the histories of computer art. Within the short span of their three years -- taking place at The Kitchen in 1973 and '74 before relocating to the CUNY Graduate Center in 1975 -- the festivals brought together over 100 different artists, showcasing prescient experiments with computers from a wide array of disciplines, including music, film, video, and graphic sculpture. In this conversation with the festival’s early organizers and participants, EAI and the CUNY Graduate Center will consider computer art’s early history and its entanglement with the multidisciplinary spirit of intermedia art, as well as the role of institutions including public funding structures, arts organizations, and universities in cultivating a rich context and support network for emerging media art.

This panel assembles original participants including Dimitri Devyatkin, Charles Dodge, Louise Etra, and Alison Knowles with Joshua Selman, moderated by curator Michelle Kuo. RSVP for the panel here.

Learn more about Panel #2: Digital Art and Institutional Models here.

 

EAI at 50 at Metrograph: Bernadette Corporation

Metrograph

7 Ludlow Street

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is pleased to partner with Metrograph to present a series of programs highlighting our catalogue and its essential role in the history of artists’ moving image work. This program coincides with our ongoing celebration of EAI's 50th anniversary.

Formed in 1994, Bernadette Corporation is a multi-hyphenate, international, and anonymous art collective whose feverish output resists pat categorization. The group has spanned a wide range of cultural production including nightlife promotion, fashion, the magazine Made In USA, the collectively-authored novel Reena Spaulings (Semiotext(e), 2005), gallery art, and the medium of publicity itself. This evening pairs two key video works, which embody their spirit of détournement and defiant self-effacement: Hell Frozen Over (2000), described by the group as "a fashion film about the poetry of Stéphane Mallarmé and the color white,” and Get Rid of Yourself (2002), an “anti-documentary” fusing footage of the G8 summit protests in Genoa, Italy with appearances by actress Chloë Sevigny and artist-philosopher Werner von Delmont.

Introduced by Lizzi Bougatsos.

Buy tickets here.

 

EAI at 50 at Metrograph: November

Metrograph

7 Ludlow Street
metrograph.com

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is pleased to partner with Metrograph to present a series of programs highlighting our catalogue and its essential role in the history of artists’ moving image work. This program coincides with our ongoing celebration of EAI's 50th anniversary.

Continuing this November, EAI presents a slate of works for both Metrograph's theater as well as its At Home online platform. The second installment of this program will focus on artists who have embraced the radical potential of mass media, and iterative possibilities of videotape and broadcast. Throughout the month, we will screen theatrical engagements of Robert Beck/Buck’s Cruising (Back to Front), a scene-by-scene reversal of William Friedkin’s notorious thriller; Zoe Beloff’s trilogy of works exploring unrealized Hollywood films by radical artists (Sergei Eisenstein, Bretolt Brecht, and James Agee, respectively); and Ulysses Jenkins and Video Venice News’ Remnants of the Watts Festival, documenting the annual summer music festival in the southeast Los Angeles neighborhood. On Metrograph’s streaming platform, we present a showcase of Robert Beck/Buck’s short video works, and two programs pairing artists Jaime Davidovich and Kristin Lucas, and Shana Moulton and Trevor Shimizu.

In theaters:

Cruising (Back to Front)
Robert Beck/Buck, 1998
Monday, November 15th, 8:30 pm
With introduction by Robert Beck/Buck

Fragments for a Future: Brecht, Agee, and Eisensten
Three Works by Zoe Beloff
Zoe Beloff, 2015-2019, 104 min
Monday, November 22th, 8:30 pm
With introduction by Zoe Beloff

Remnants of the Watts Festival
Ulysses Jenkins, 1972-73, 60 min
Monday, November 29th, 8:30 pm

At home:

Shorts works by Robert Beck/Buck
Available November 16th to 21th
With introduction and conversation by Robert Beck/Buck

Short works by Jaime Davidovich and Kristin Lucas
Available November 23th to 28th

Short works by Shana Moulton and Trevor Shimizu
Available November 30th to December 5th

 

EAI at 50 at Metrograph: October

Metrograph

7 Ludlow Street
metrograph.com

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is pleased to partner with Metrograph to present a series of programs highlighting our catalogue and its essential role in the history of artists’ moving image work. This program coincides with our ongoing celebration of EAI's 50th anniversary.

Beginning this month with a series of works complimenting Metrograph's Lives of Performers, a program probing titles that move between "the clarifying spectacle of the stage and the complexities of life outside of the spotlight," EAI presents a slate of works for both Metrograph's theater as well as its At Home online platform. Screening at Metrograph, catch theatrical engagements of Ellen Cantor's sprawling Pinochet Porn (2008-16); Charles Atlas's fictionalized profile of dancer Michael Clark, Hail the New Puritan (1987); and Mike Kelley's Mobile Homestead (2012), a documentary of his reconstructed childhood home's journey, as it travels down Michigan Avenue to be installed at Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit (MOCAD). On their streaming platform, watch supplemental programs showcasing Ellen Cantor's diaristic appropriations of classic cinema and a collection of ebullient artists' videos by Atlas, Cheryl Donegan, Kalup Linzy, and Jacolby Satterwhite.

In-person theatrical screenings will take place at Metrograph at 7 Ludlow Street. Proof of a COVID-19 vaccine is required for entry, and a face mask or covering is required for all guests at all times. Online screenings are viewable through Metrograph's membership-based At Home streaming platform, with access beginning at $5/month. 

In theaters:

Pinochet Porn
Ellen Cantor, 2008-16, 123 min
Saturday, October 23rd, 7:30 pm
With introduction by John Brattin, the director of photography of the film

Hail the New Puritan
Charles Atlas, 1985-86, 85 min
Friday, October 29th, 8 pm 

Mobile Homestead
Mike Kelley, 2012, 157 min
Saturday, October 30th, 4:30 pm 

At home:

Selected Works by Ellen Cantor
Ellen Cantor, 1996-2002, 46 min
Available October 22 to 27

It's a Jackie Thing Shorts Program
Various artists, 1994-2007, 77 min
Available October 29 to November 3

 

Joan Jonas Knowledge Base: Launch Event and Virtual Program

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) and Dia Art Foundation

www.eai.org

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is pleased to present an online exhibition of Joan Jonas's early video works, complementing the launch of NYU's Joan Jonas Knowledge Base (JJKB), an open source digital resource housing generous information about the New York-based artist. This screening program, freely accessible through October 25th, features key early videos by the artist, and a reel of unedited footage from Organic Honey's Visual Telepathy (1972), providing a rare insight into Jonas's process and precise orchestrations for camera. Works included here highlight the artist's pioneering explorations into the phenomenology of video as mirror (Left Side Right Side, Glass Puzzle, and Disturbances), and meditative portraits of landscape and memory (Barking, Merlo, and I Want to Live in the Country). Also included is documentation from the October 15th launch event hosted by Dia Art Foundation (RSVP here), featuring an introduction to the JJKB by project directors Barbara Clausen, Deena Engel, Lozana Rossenova, and Glenn Wharton, and a discussion among the artist, EAI director Rebecca Cleman, and Haus der Kunst director Andrea Lissoni. Explore the Joan Jonas Knowledge Base here. To learn more about the Joan Jonas exhibition open now at Dia Beacon, visit their website.

Explore the online video program here.

 

Etudes & Riffs: Selected Works by Philip Mallory Jones

Maysles Documentary Center

maysles.org

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) and Maysles Documentary Center (@mayslesdocumentarycenter) are pleased to present Etudes & Riffs: Selected Works by Philip Mallory Jones, a career-spanning survey of videos by media artist Philip Mallory Jones. Ranging from impressionistic portraits of Black American life, experimental videos made abroad in Burkina Faso and Angola, to his recent 3D reconstruction of Chicago’s Bronzeville neighborhood circa 1940, these works display Jones’s idiosyncratic approach to technological innovation and ongoing inquiry into the roots and branches of the African diaspora. 

For over five decades, Jones has experimented with the possibilities of emerging video technologies. He co-founded and directed Ithaca Video Projects (1971-84), a collectively-run media arts center, and the Ithaca Video Festival (1974-84). Utilizing a wide array of tools including film and video animation, the CD-ROM and optical disc, the online virtual world Second Life, 3D modeling software, and the game development engine Unity, Jones has forged an oeuvre as varied in its visual splendor as in its ideas of place, history, and identity. 

Join us for an opening online screening and conversation between Philip Mallory Jones and scholar Patricia R. Zimmerman on Thursday, May 20 at 7PM ET. The program will stream live here.

 

Jacob Ciocci and David Wightman: Psychology Today

Screen Slate

twitch.tv/screenslate

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is pleased to partner with Screen Slate to present a free screening of Extreme Animals' Psychology Today, plus a new "megamix" of various short works by Paper Rad, Extreme Animals, and Jacob Ciocci.

Featuring a live discussion with Jacob Ciocci and David Wightman moderated by Screen Slate's Jon Dieringer. Learn more here.

 

DOWNTOWN 2021

LaMaMa Galleria and Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI)

downtown2021.eai.org

Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is pleased to co-present an online video program component of the exhibition DOWNTOWN 2021, featuring works by Peggy Ahwesh, Charles Atlas, K8 Hardy, Sky Hopinka, Kalup Linzy, and Jacob Robichaux.

DOWNTOWN 2021 is presented by LaMaMa Galleria and curated by Sam Gordon. The exhibition takes its name from the film Downtown 81, which portrayed a day in the New York City of 1981 in all its glory. Forty years later, the exhibition acts as a sequel to the film, taking inspiration from downtown as an idea, a state of mind, and a generative space—rather than just a geographic location—and extending its scope beyond Manhattan to galleries in Brooklyn and Queens—and online.